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Classic Egg Fried Rice with Cashews

Make comforting fried rice even better with crunchy cashews

We recently had an absolute ball of a time filming a fab brand new series with Videojug’s Scoff Food!

In the first video of our new Asian Bites series we whipped up a classic and foolproof egg fried rice. Then we jazzed it up with a super indulgent, moreish-beyond-words, crunchy and golden surprise: deep fried cashews!

Getting one of these in your spoonful of rice is like finding a cheeky £2 coin in your wallet when you could’ve sworn there were only 10p coins jangling about. In other words, it’s a real delight.

For the best fried rice, cook the rice the night before and allow it to chill in the fridge – this way your grains will be nicely separated from each other when it comes to stir-frying.

Serves
4
Ingredients

200g long grain white rice
4 tbsp vegetable oil
5 eggs
1 tsp ginger, finely diced
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground white pepper
1 tsp granulated sugar
1 tsp light soy sauce
1/4 tsp dark soy sauce
2 spring onions
80g cashew nuts

We recently had an absolute ball of a time filming a fab brand new series with Videojug’s Scoff Food!

In the first video of our new Asian Bites series we whipped up a classic and foolproof egg fried rice. Then we jazzed it up with a super indulgent, moreish-beyond-words, crunchy and golden surprise: deep fried cashews!

Getting one of these in your spoonful of rice is like finding a cheeky £2 coin in your wallet when you could’ve sworn there were only 10p coins jangling about. In other words, it’s a real delight.

For the best fried rice, cook the rice the night before and allow it to chill in the fridge – this way your grains will be nicely separated from each other when it comes to stir-frying.

GET THE METHOD →

Cool the rice and let it cool. Do this the night before, if you have the time.
OUR
TIP!
Cooking rice on the hob is easy - just follow our recipe for perfect fluffy rice.
Prepare the cashews by deep-frying them for 1-2 minutes in oil until golden brown and toasted. You can alternatively give the cashews a shallow fry or a light toasting in a frying pan, if you wish.
Beat 3 eggs in a bowl along with a pinch of salt and 1 tsp oil. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in the wok over a high heat. Add the beaten eggs, reduce the heat to medium and scramble until just set. Scoop the softly cooked egg onto a plate and set aside.
Wipe the wok with kitchen paper and return it to a high heat with 2 tablespoons oil. Fry the ginger until fragrant and add the cooked rice. Reduce to a medium heat and stir-fry for a few minutes until the rice is heated through.
Add the salt, pepper, sugar and soy sauces and stir-fry for a further minute until the rice is evenly coated with the seasonings.
Beat the remaining eggs in a bowl with a pinch of salt and pepper. Make a well in the centre of the rice. Add 1 tablespoon oil to the well. Add the eggs to the well then mix them through the rice to coat the grains. Stir-fry for 2 minutes until the egg is cooked.
Add the previously cooked eggs, the spring onion and cashew nuts, and stir-fry for a further minute. The rice is ready when it has dried out and become a golden yellow colour. Serve piping hot.
OUR
TIP!
You can check if the rice is ready by clearing a spot in the wok, leaving just a a few grains of rice in the centre. Perfectly toasty grains will jump up from the wok.
  • Probably should not have watched this at 4:02pm in the afternoon. I. AM. NOW. STARVING. Lovely to see you girls in action. I felt like you were chatting to me. Lots of love FoodStars xxx

  • rtuesday

    Avocados are all but unknown in China. In 20 years in China, I’ve never met anyone who knew what an avocado is.

    • True true. Our food often includes ingredients that we love to eat, regardless of what cuisine we’re cooking, especially since we grew up in New Zealand. So you recipes are a mix of classic/traditional, and modern/fusion. Hope you like both!

  • Don Goracke

    My wife is from mainland China living now in America and I always felt unprepared to cook until now! Thanks girls

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